Archive for the ‘Drama’ Category

The Portable MFA in Creative Writing, written by instructors from the New York Writer’s Workshop, is currently available for FREE in Kindle format at amazon.com. Check the link.

The book is 280 pages long and contains chapters on writing fiction, poetry, plays, memoir and magazine articles. I haven’t read the book and so can’t personally recommend it, but the reviews at amazon seem pretty good and the book is, after all, free.

If you haven’t tried Kindle books yet, note that you don’t have to have a Kindle device to read them–you can read Kindle books on your laptop, your IPad, whatever.

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Mussolini

“the relationship between Fascism and the literary intelligentsia badly needs investigation…”
George Orwell

“If modernism cut exhilarating loose from exhausted national traditions, it did so, after all, as a deracinated, disorientated elite–One corollary of that was a virulently anti-democratic politics.”
Terry Eagleton

Despite Eagleton’s claim, no one can prove  literary Modernism was overwhelmingly Fascist or anti-democratic. The movement was simply too diverse to be easily characterized, and there were many Modernist Leftists.

On the other hand, Orwell’s caution was sound: There were  a disturbing number of Modernist writers who made common cause with Fascism when it counted. Should you be interested in which writers avowed themselves as fascists, see the following list.

Irving Babbitt (literary critic)

Louis-Ferdinand Céline (novelist)

Martin Heidegger (philosopher)

T. E. Hulme (critic)

F. T. Marinetti (poet)

Henry Miller (novelist)

Wyndham Lewis (writer)

Ezra Pound (poet)

Kenneth Roberts (novelist)

George Santayana (philosopher)

William Butler Yeats
(poet)

Stark Young (drama critic, New Republic)

Some interesting reads:

Cover of George Brant's book, Elephant's Graveyard

George Brant‘s play, Elephant’s Graveyard, dramatizes one of the stranger events in American history, the documented lynching of a circus elephant, Mary, in Erwin, Tennessee on September 13, 1916. I was lucky enough to see the play staged  at the Oscar Brockett Theater in Austin in 2007. I thought then  it was one of the funniest,  strangest and most dazzling plays I had ever seen, and certainly, by the end, one of the saddest. I’ve since read the play, recently published by Samuel French, three times, and my admiration for Brant’s work has only increased. Narrative and dramatic mastery. Highly recommended.

These are the best books Bat Terrier has read this year. Of course, the year isn’t done, and this list might change. But so far, these books all look like contenduhs.

Click for reviews etc.

(Full disclosure: No books by friends listed here.)