Posts Tagged ‘Publishing’

The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that amazon.com will enter the book publishing business as early as this July. Looks like their original publishing focus will be on romance, science fiction, literary fiction, YA, business and general non-fiction. See the link here. Surprisingly, it looks like amazon will publish in both digital and print formats. Maybe the printed book has a future after all… 🙂

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Best advice yet on how to deal with writerly jealousy, envy and bitterness.

“There isn’t a thing to eat down there in the rabbit hole of your bitterness except your own desperate heart.”

Highly recommended, especially when someone you don’t like so much gets a big book deal.

Ingrid Ricks breaks down the basics of author self-promotion: build a web site, use social media, blog, reach out to book bloggers, send out press releases. Good advice, but Bat Terrier wonders what ever happened to silence, exile, and cunning as an author’s primary strategies… 😉

Change or die: Canadian author Derek Beaulieu says the novel is either dying or on its way to reinvention. (Meanwhile, in 2008, the last year for which data is available, publishers in the United States published more than 47,000 fiction titles. Fiction is still the top-selling category in book publishing. See Bowker‘s statistics here. Bat Terrier assumes the vast bulk of these novels are “traditional” narratives and that the genre remains stubbornly un-reinvented.)

And… So you wanna be a critic? John Sutherland‘s top 10 books about books, from Aristotle’s Poetics to Henry Louis Gate’s The Signifying Monkey.

Interesting post at The Nervous Breakdown about how the publishing industry really works these days. Takeaway for writers: “Becoming an author in order to get rich is like going to the desert in order to become wet.” (Sigh.) Recommended.

What is a book review? And why should we read them? Joseph Mackin at the New York Journal of Books has the scoop: “Reviews are essential tools for supplying the critical data that readers need to situate a book in the universal library.”

And new recordings of Scott Fitzgerald reading Keats and Shakespeare at PennSound.